Using Metal Panels to Stand Up to Hurricanes

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 18, 2017 2:00:00 PM / by Ken Quigley

In areas of the U.S. prone to being hit by hurricanes, like Florida, it is critical that buildings are constructed to stand up to the strength of storms.

Weather-resistant Metal Paneling is one application that is currently being used to withstand the potential damage caused by hurricanes.

According to a recent article in The Construction Specifier, Orlando Veteran Affairs Medical Center, located in a region with a 40% risk of encountering a hurricane, has installed more than 245,000 sf of weather-resistant metal walls, tested to withstand winds from a Category 3 hurricane

As stated in the article, the building features thermal efficiency, moisture control, and weather resistance suitable for the hurricane risk in Orlando, the panels are pressure-equalized along horizontal joints. Insulated metal vertical (IMV) joints are also employed, improving visual appeal by creating the illusion of an uninterrupted façade and minimizing both streaking and staining. All panels used are 22-gage and feature foamed-in-place cores to minimize gaps in insulation.

Continue reading full article here. 

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Protecting Infrastructures from Major Floods

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 14, 2017 4:00:00 PM / by Ken Quigley

Flooding has dominated much of the news in recent years and this hurricane season it seems to be even more prevalent. The impact of this flooding is greater due to growing infrastructure and the rapid rate that new construction is going up.

Concrete is the modern world’s most commonly used building material however century-old concrete structures are outlasting modern concrete structures erected in the last 50-years. Why? One factor is the way in which the buildings are reinforced. According to a recent article in The Construction Specifier, instead of using solid stone, most U.S. infrastructure is constructed of reinforcing steel embedded within poured concrete. As the priorities of construction methods shift to increase productivity and streamline scheduling, long-term durability often takes a backseat.

The following article provides case studies about different reinforcement methods being employed to protect against major flooding. Read more.

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CCA adds Structural Engineer

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 12, 2017 11:00:00 AM / by Mark McGivern

CCA is pleased to welcome John O'Rourke, Structural Engineer

With deep expertise in residential, commercial, and industrial engineering, John O’Rourke has recently joined CCA’s New York City office as a Structural Engineer.

Mr. O’Rourke’s experience in the roles of Structural Engineer and Project Engineer have spanned across a multitude of residential, commercial, and industrial engineering projects. His direct experience is the result of working within engineering groups consisting of Civil, Structural, Architectural, Building Mechanical, Electrical and Process Piping Engineering Departments.

In addition to his background in engineering, Mr. O’Rouke has gained in depth design experience. His designs include: structural steel buildings, seismic design, shallow foundations, wood structures and buildings, and masonry. Additionally, he has provided special designs for retaining structures and avalanche shielding structures.

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: CCA LLC/The CCA Group announces an alliance with The Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health (CTEH)

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 1, 2017 10:04:08 PM / by Diana Bass

SERVING INSURANCE AND LEGAL ENTITIES, AND OWNERS AFFECTED BY HURRICANE HARVEY AN ALLIANCE TO PROVIDE COMPREHENSIVE ENGINEERING, CONSTRUCTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES IS FORMED

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CCA adds Senior Architect

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 29, 2017 11:00:00 AM / by Mark McGivern

CCA is pleased to welcome Daniel Hogan, RA, AIA

Daniel Hogan has recently joined CCA’s New York City office as a Senior Architect and brings with him nearly 30 years of experience overseeing complex construction and forensic architecture.

As a licensed design professional, Daniel J. Hogan excels at providing expert forensic architectural analysis in situations where site or building systems have failed or have been damaged.  In addition to architectural knowledge of all building systems and construction, Dan has extensive experience in roof systems, waterproofing systems, and other aspects of building construction including interior finishes, plumbing systems, and structural systems.

Mr. Hogan has provided expert opinion as it relates to understanding important aspects of cases involving death or injury related to the built environment and applicable codes, statutes, regulations, construction, design practices, and accepted engineering standards.

His career has included a focus on practical field experience and construction administration of complex construction with special technical expertise in the areas of roofing, waterproofing, New York City construction, and site design.  Dan has effectively managed and coordinated the work of sub-consultant structural, mechanical, electrical, and site engineers as well as numerous specialty consultants.

 

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If All Else Fails – Communicate Effectively!

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 16, 2017 12:37:00 PM / by John R. Manning, PE, CCM, LEED

 

Many projects often bring to mind the famous line from Cool Hand Luke – “What we've got here is a failure to communicate.”

 

One of the definitions of communication from Merriam Webster Dictionary is “a technique for expressing ideas effectively.” On today’s projects, everyone on the project seems to be communicating, whether that be talking, emailing and/or sending correspondence, but the reality is that no effective communication is occurring. Many times, project participants are overwhelmed with the amount of correspondence and get extremely defensive of their positions, especially if they miss something. We may not have a failure to communicate but it appears many times that we have a failure to communicate EFFECTIVELY.

So how do we address this failure to communicate effectively??? I still remember one of my first classes on public speaking where the professor laid out a simple yet effective outline for a speech. He said in the Opening you tell them what you plan on speaking about; then in the Body you tell them what you are speaking about; and, finally, in the Conclusion you tell them what you told them! This has been shown to be an extremely effective means of communicating in speech to inform someone of a topic.

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The Importance of a Quality Management Plan and Why it Should be Completed Early!

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 8, 2017 10:30:00 AM / by John R. Manning, PE, CCM, LEED

 

Quality on a project, many times, is one of the last considerations for an Owner whom usually focuses first on cost and then schedule.

 At the end of the day, the Quality of a built project is extremely critical for a lot longer than the time it took to design and build it. In the Project Management Plan, there should be a Quality Management Plan portion. In that segment the Project Manager should outline who will be responsible for delivering quality on a project. This starts first with a good design. One of the first steps the Owner’s Representative can do is to develop a Differentiation Document that clearly outlines who will be responsible for what in a Project, similar to the following example of a site and pool area development.

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Mold Within City Buildings: A Common & Growing Issue Part 3

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 1, 2017 2:58:00 PM / by Morris Yarjovski, CCPM, CCI

Part three of a three part series

As I hinted to in an earlier post, reducing the number of mold cases in both new and older buildings will require a multi-prong approach.  First, we must consider the construction process when evaluating the strategies that might be used to combat mold in our structures.  Then, the building’s envelope design; and finally, the materials chosen.

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Why early clarification of the Owner’s Objectives is CRITICAL

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 24, 2017 1:32:00 PM / by John R. Manning, PE, CCM, LEED

 

As an Owner’s Representative one of the MOST CRITICAL tasks you must do is to ensure that the Owner’s Objectives are clear. Having testified in court on construction management issues, I have learned one of the most difficult things to overcome is an Owner who believes they bought “X” and received “Y” due to the documents not being clear. 

 

When the Owner’s Objectives do not have adequate detail to allow the Contractor to build the project as the Owner desired, conflicts are sure to follow. Furthermore, some of the most difficult obstacles to overcome on a project are Owner directed changes that impact the schedule after a contract is let. Contractors tend to price Impact Charges on these changes which causes the price of the desired changes to increase to an amount that far exceeds the cost if it had been included in the original contract.

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Mold Within City Buildings: A Common & Growing Issue Part 2

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 20, 2017 2:52:00 PM / by Morris Yarjovski, CCPM, CCI

Part two of a three part series

In older buildings, the facility needs to be reviewed diagnostically. By that, I mean, the structure needs to be analyzed for what may be producing a problem, and not just from what can be designed better. In other words, we need to observe the sources that contribute to the growth of mold within the aging structure.

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